• Let’s fix the economy from the ground up, starting with food.

    Do you believe that your health, the economy’s health and the environment’s health would all be significantly improved if there were a million new small and mid-sized organic farms in the United States? Join in and get started:

  • Introducing the Slow Money Journal

    96 pages of interviews, essays, reports from entrepreneurs and investors … and even a few paintings and a poem. We’re sharing, learning and building local food systems together.

    Learn More

This is how we do it…

Convene

Local Group

Attend a regional or national Slow Money event

Our Events

Invest

Connect

Join a local network or investment club

Local Groups

Learn

Slow Money Journal

Voices from the field, investment tracking, a poem …

Journal

Introducing

Slow Money Journal

96 pages of interviews, essays, reports from entrepreneurs and investors … and even a few paintings and a poem.

Sharing the beauty of an emerging public conversation about food, money and the soil. Published twice a year. More engaging than a single blog post, more thought-provoking than a newsletter. (We hope.)

Learn More

We must bring money back down to earth.

SLOW MONEY PRINCIPLE #1

Join us and Sign the Principles

Global Map

Connect

Local Groups

We have 23 local networks and 8 investment clubs, with many more in formation.

Find others like you who are leading the charge in the local food system and the local economy by checking out the Slow Money map!

Find a Group

What would the world be like if we invested 50% of our assets within 50 miles of where we live?

SLOW MONEY PRINCIPLE #6

Join us and Sign the Principles

Our Progress

$46 Million

invested

473

enterprises funded

33,170

signatories

Featured Stories and Updates

Woody Tasch

State of the Soil

/
I am not a Democrat. I am not a Republican. I am not
 a political animal. I’m just an earthworm. An earthworm in the soil of a restorative economy.
Eliot Coleman

My Agricultural Grandparents

/
It is not uncommon for farmers to talk about the influence their grandparents had on their farming education and their eventual success in agriculture. I am no different. But my story comes with a unique twist. My paternal grandfather, Leander Walter Townsend Coleman, was born in 1868 but was not a farmer. Unfortunately for my farming career, the Coleman family association with farming on the family land had ended three generations before Leander’s birth. So the grandparents I am about to acknowledge are not related to me by blood.
Jim Baird in a field of organic vetch in the Columbia River Basin

Investing in Soil Health, One Piece of Land at a Time

/
Three years ago, in collaboration with a group of farmers and investors, my spouse and I formed an LLC called Living Lands. Together we wrote our purpose and articles of incorporation to place the highest priority on soil health. Under the astute guidance and leadership of Jim Baird, a longtime farmer in eastern Washington and a founding member of Slow Money, we purchased a 100-acre piece of farmland in the Columbia River Basin.